Not Another Statistic

Apr 22

hideyowallets:

Mini m&m’s are better than the regular sized ones, but the pretzel ones are the best.

Apr 22
wantering-blog:

7 Tips on How to be Fashionably Responsible
Love fashion AND want to do all you can for the environment? This Wednesday, our stylish friend Myriam, Founder of Eco Fashion Week, talks about 7 things you can do to be more fashionably responsible. Take it away Myriam!
1. Ask yourself: “Do I really need it?” 

Most of our purchases are impulsive. You will often surprise yourself by answering “no” to the question.
2. Be curious and be informed.

Ask the salesperson in store questions, read labels (where is it made? what is it made of?), follow eco fashion-focused blogs like Ecouterre, Eco-salon, or Tree Hugger.
3. Be proud of bringing your re-usable shopping bags, even if it is in a high-end store.

Does your t-shirt need to be wrapped in a paper with a ribbon, in a box, in a fancy bag with even more paper? There is totally a prestige factor to it, but what happens to all of this after? Re-use? Recycle? Garbage? Being “eco” is not only with your actions, but with your attitude as well.
4. Wear your clothes!

There is no wrong in wearing the same pair of pants or sweater twice or even three times in a week. Be creative and style those differently. Take a minute and look at your closet right now. How many things have you only worn once, or never? Once you are done going through your closet, DONATE!
5. Buy quality.

If you really must buy, make sure your clothes have long lifespans. The higher the quality, the longer the life. Basic and classic pieces should always be part of your wardrobe. Look for well-made clothes with high-end fabrics and materials, and timeless patterns. If you shop this way, you will wear your clothes over and over again without getting tired of them.
6. Take the leap and try second hand clothing. 

If you buy around 10 clothing items per month, try to get at least 1 out of 10 of them used. You can find stylish used pieces from vintage and thrift stores. Better yet, exchange clothes with other fashionable friends (it’s free!), or have a fashion swap event. Stop being scared of wearing second hand clothing; there is nothing to fear. Start with accessories, like a purse or a belt, and see how you feel; you’ll start to notice how people compliment you for your fashionably responsible finds..  
7. Find your own “Eco Recipe”. 

There are many ways of being fashionably responsible, and we do not have the same personal, human and financial resources. Find what fits you and commit to improve every year. Between second hand clothing, local manufacturing, organic or recycled material, fair labor, upcycling… you have many options. It’s simpler than you think, and guess what, it feels amazing to take action and be the change!

This guest post lovingly crafted for you by:Myriam L.Founder of Eco Fashion Week@ecostylist
(photos from Giphy 1/2/3/4/5/6/7)

Did you know organic and eco fashion labels live on Wantering? Take for example, Greg Lauren, Ralph Lauren’s nephew that creates stylish fashion pieces with military-motif from vintage materials. Check out his work now!

wantering-blog:

7 Tips on How to be Fashionably Responsible

Love fashion AND want to do all you can for the environment? This Wednesday, our stylish friend Myriam, Founder of Eco Fashion Week, talks about 7 things you can do to be more fashionably responsible. Take it away Myriam!

1. Ask yourself: “Do I really need it?”

Most of our purchases are impulsive. You will often surprise yourself by answering “no” to the question.

2. Be curious and be informed.

Ask the salesperson in store questions, read labels (where is it made? what is it made of?), follow eco fashion-focused blogs like Ecouterre, Eco-salon, or Tree Hugger.

3. Be proud of bringing your re-usable shopping bags, even if it is in a high-end store.

Does your t-shirt need to be wrapped in a paper with a ribbon, in a box, in a fancy bag with even more paper? There is totally a prestige factor to it, but what happens to all of this after? Re-use? Recycle? Garbage? Being “eco” is not only with your actions, but with your attitude as well.

4. Wear your clothes!

There is no wrong in wearing the same pair of pants or sweater twice or even three times in a week. Be creative and style those differently. Take a minute and look at your closet right now. How many things have you only worn once, or never? Once you are done going through your closet, DONATE!

5. Buy quality.

If you really must buy, make sure your clothes have long lifespans. The higher the quality, the longer the life. Basic and classic pieces should always be part of your wardrobe. Look for well-made clothes with high-end fabrics and materials, and timeless patterns. If you shop this way, you will wear your clothes over and over again without getting tired of them.

6. Take the leap and try second hand clothing.

If you buy around 10 clothing items per month, try to get at least 1 out of 10 of them used. You can find stylish used pieces from vintage and thrift stores. Better yet, exchange clothes with other fashionable friends (it’s free!), or have a fashion swap event. Stop being scared of wearing second hand clothing; there is nothing to fear. Start with accessories, like a purse or a belt, and see how you feel; you’ll start to notice how people compliment you for your fashionably responsible finds..  

7. Find your own “Eco Recipe”.

There are many ways of being fashionably responsible, and we do not have the same personal, human and financial resources. Find what fits you and commit to improve every year. Between second hand clothing, local manufacturing, organic or recycled material, fair labor, upcycling… you have many options. It’s simpler than you think, and guess what, it feels amazing to take action and be the change!


This guest post lovingly crafted for you by:
Myriam L.
Founder of Eco Fashion Week
@ecostylist

(photos from Giphy 1/2/3/4/5/6/7)


Did you know organic and eco fashion labels live on Wantering? Take for example, Greg Lauren, Ralph Lauren’s nephew that creates stylish fashion pieces with military-motif from vintage materials. Check out his work now!
Wantering - Google+

Apr 22
Apr 18

quote Oh I am sorry, is my anger confronting your ignorance?

— Never apologize for being angry at oppression because if used correctly anger can bring about positive results. (via korrathefirebender)
Apr 18

nicoosuxx:

 ooh this my shit, this my shit.

Apr 15
Apr 15
Apr 15

ohsnapthatskilla:

Why SZA’s Huge Natural Hair is Our New Obsession
by Chioma Nnadi

After the ethereal sound of her voice, the single most mesmerizing thing about singer SZA is her hair. Her super voluminous curls fill the frame of music videos and lend a spellbinding halo effect to performances center stage. “I’m a late bloomer and a total tomboy,” says the New Jersey native. “My hair is definitely my saving grace where femininity is concerned.” As the only girl on a record label roster that includes West Coast hip-hop prodigy Kendrick Lamar, the talented 24-year-old certainly holds her own, and releases her first solo album, Z, on TDE next month. Her vibrant tresses have a triumphant story of their very own: After falling ill as a teenager, she lost all of her hair from medication-related side effects, and her wild natural curls have been a badge of honor ever since. We sat down with SZA to talk about her childhood influences, Lauryn Hill’s dreads, the joys of co-washing, and why every girl needs a pot of coconut oil in her life.

When did you start wearing your hair so big?
Well I guess I’ve been looking this way since middle school, before big natural hair was even popular. My mom was adamant about not doing anything to my hair. I grew up Muslim, and wore the hijab through middle school. The only girl that I could look to for natural hair inspiration growing up was Lauryn Hill. I wanted dreads but my mom wanted me to wait until I was sixteen, by which time I didn’t want them anymore.

How did you look after your hair growing up?
I broke so many combs and brushes growing up that eventually my mom decided that we should perm it. I was in eighth grade. So all my curls were stretched out and I had these superlong pigtails that fell down my back—but chemical straighteners break your hair, and I ended up going through so many hair transformations from there on. I remember bleaching part of my hair platinum blonde, Cruella De Vil-style, the day before an important meeting with Howard University when I was in eleventh grade. My mom was furious. I also got really ill in high school and my hair fell out because of the medication I was taking.

How did losing your hair affect you?
It’s such a big part of my personality so it was really tough. I hid behind my hair before, but I had nothing to hide behind in that moment. I think the very idea of femininity fell apart for me, but in a good way, because after that, the superficial things didn’t matter so much. None of it mattered. I don’t even shave my legs. Today is the most made-up I’ve ever been in my life. My mom on the other hand, is the classiest woman I know. She has elegant hands, and always gets her nails done. I wonder if I’ll ever grow out of my jerseys and into a lady.

What do you do to look after your hair now?
I like to co-wash, which means washing without a shampoo. I just use a conditioner and coconut oil, and then I rinse my hair with lukewarm water instead of hot water which strips hair of all the moisture. I make my own deep conditioner from coconut oil, avocado, a drop of Pantene’s conditioner for women of color, cinnamon, and tea tree oil. Then I sit and catch up on TiVo’d episodes of Chopped and Iron Chef. If I have time I’ll twist it, but my hair takes days to dry so I usually blow-dry it out with a diffuser instead. I’ll lean over the blow-dryer and divide my hair into four sections, but I never comb it through because it breaks up the curls. I use a silicone-based heat protector to keep it from getting super frizzy, and coconut oil, and that melts in your hand and won’t weigh your hair down either. I haven’t had a chemical relaxer for at least six or seven years.

Apr 15
Apr 15
demifull:

rosydrops:

Cleaning
clean bathroom tips
organize your closet
how to fix a leaky faucet
how to keep a clean kitchen
removing stains from your carpet
Money
how to coupon
what to do when you can’t pay your bills
see if you’re paying too much for your cell phone bill
how to save money
How to Balance a Check Book
How to do Your Own Taxes
Health
how to take care of yourself when you’re sick
things to bring to a doctor’s appointment
what to expect from your first gynecologist appointment
how to make a doctor’s appointment
how to pick a health insurance plan
a list of stress relievers
how to get free therapy

how to remove a splinter


how to avoid a hangover

Emergency
what to do if you get pulled over by a cop
a list of hotlines in a crisis
things to keep in your car in case of an emergency

how to do the heimlich maneuver

Food
recipes that take 30 minutes or less
Yummy apple thing
Brownie in a cup
Cookie in a cup
French bread pizza
Egg tacos
panera mac n cheese recipe
different salad recipes
harry potter recipes
healthy recipes
various cookie recipes
chocolate cupcakes w/ eggless cookie dough topping
s’mores pie 
nutella hot chocolate
peanut butter nutella swirl cookies
cookie in a mug
starbucks holiday drinks
fruit leathers 
brownie in a mug
how to make ramen 1000x better
eggless cookie dough (not to bake, just to eat)
make recipes using things you already have
how to put together a very fancy cheese plate 
make different flavored lemonades
various desert recipes
make tiny chocolate chip cookies
20 dishes every cook should know
learn how to make your own tea
Macaroni and cheese in a mug
Study snacks (2)
40 on-the-go breakfast recipes
Home
what the hell is a mortgage?
first apartment essentials checklist
how to care for cacti and succulents
the care and keeping of plants 
Getting an apartment
Job
time management
create a resume
find the right career
how to pick a major

how to avoid a hangover

how to interview for a job

how to stop procrastinating

How to write cover letters
Travel
ULTIMATE PACKING LIST
Traveling for Cheap 
Travel Accessories
The Best Way to Pack a Suitcase
How To Read A Map
How to Apply For A Passport
How to Make A Travel Budget
Better You
read the news
leave your childhood traumas behind
how to quit smoking

how to get a book published


how to knit


how to use a polaroid camera


how to solve a rubik’s cube


how to stop biting your nails


how to stop procrastinating


how to stop skipping breakfast


how to stop micromanaging


how to stop avoiding asking for help


how to stop swearing constantly


how to stop being a pushover

learn another language
how to improve your self-esteem
how to sew
learn how to embroider
how to love yourself
learn how to do yoga
100 tips for life
learn how to make your own cards

HELPFUL THINGS ARE HELPFUL

demifull:

rosydrops:

Cleaning

Money

Health

Emergency

Food

Home

Job

Travel

Better You

HELPFUL THINGS ARE HELPFUL